Chemistry

Programmes Offered

Curriculum

B.Sc. in Chemistry

B.Sc-Chem

B.Sc. (Honours) in Chemistry

Students who passed second year with GPA ≥ 4 are eligible to attend B.Sc. (Honours) classes for three more years. After finished successfully, they earn B.Sc. (Hons) degree majoring in Chemistry.

B.Sc(Hons)-Chem

M.Sc. in Chemistry

Students who passed B.Sc. (Honours) with GPA greater than 4 are eligible to attend M.Sc. classes for two more years. After finished successfully, they are earned M.Sc. degree majoring in Chemistry.

M.Sc-Chem

Course Descriptions

The purpose of these modules is to enable students to understand basic principles of chemistry. In first semester, students will learn the electronic structure of atoms and periodic properties, the properties of gases and solutions and chemistry of aliphatic compounds that includes aliphatic hydrocarbons and monohydric alcohols.
In second semester, students will learn chemical bonds, metals and metalloids, general properties of aqueous solutions and chemistry of some aliphatic compounds such as ethers, aldehydes and ketones.
These modules are aimed to offers students majoring in zoology, botany, geology, physics, mathematics, marine sciences, geography and sports sciences to understand basic principles of chemistry. In first semester students will learn the electronic structure of atoms and periodic properties, aliphatic compounds that includes aliphatic hydrocarbons, monohydric alcohols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones.
In second semester, students will learn the properties of gases, the properties of solutions and the chemistry of aliphatic carboxylic acids (monocarboxylic acids) and functional derivatives of carboxylic acids (esters & amides) and amines (monoamines).
This module covers the Non-Metallic Elements; Chemical Bonding: VSEPR Theory, VB Theory, AB2 Molecules, AB3 Molecules, AB4 Molecules, AB5 Molecules and AB6 Molecules and partial ionic character of covalent bonds; Molecular Orbitals in Chemical Bonding: molecular orbitals, MO energy level diagrams, bond order and bond stability, homonuclear diatomic molecules, heteronuclear diatomic molecules, delocalization and the shapes of molecular orbitals; and the Transition Metals: members and configurations, characteristic properties, oxidation states and compound formation, 3d, 4d and 5d-transition series elements, complex ion formation, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel.
The modules includes Basic Concepts of Thermodynamics: terms and basic concepts, types of thermodynamic systems, intensive and extensive properties, state of a system, thermodynamic processes, nature of heat and work, isothermal reversible expansion work of an ideal gas, isothermal irreversible expansion work of an ideal gas, maximum work done in reversible expansion, internal energy, first law of thermodynamics, enthalpy of a system, molar heat capacities, Joule-Thomson effect, adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas, spontaneous process, some useful definitions, the Carnot cycle, derivation of entropy from Carnot cycle, entropy change in an irreversible process, entropy change for an ideal gas, entropy change accompanying change of phase, free energy function (G) and work function (A), conditions of equilibrium and criterion for a spontaneous process, the Clapeyron equation, free energy and work functions, VAN’T HOFF isotherm and Zeroth law of thermodynamics; and Thermodynamics: partial molar quantities, chemical potential or partial molar free energy, fugacity, activity, activity coefficient, Gibbs-Duhem Equation, variation of chemical potential with temperature, pressure, phase equilibrium for multi-component system and Gibbs adsorption equation.
This module aims students to familiarize with basic organic compounds. The module consists of three parts. These are Aliphatic Compounds: carboxylic acids (monocarboxylic acids), functional derivatives of carboxylic acids, esters, amides and amines (monoamines); Aromatic Compounds: nature of aromatic compounds, structure of benzene, aromaticity and Hückel Rule, benzene and its homologues; Poly Functional compounds: polyhydric alcohols, dicarboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, keto acids, keto esters, diesters.
The purpose of this module is to enable students to examine the role of chemistry in their lives and how the earth works. The module covers chemistry and its importance; chemistry and energy that includes sources of energy, renewable and non-renewable resources; chemistry in agriculture; chemistry of food; chemistry and medicine; chemistry in household products; chemistry in textile; and chemistry of building materials.
This module deals with introduction of soil chemistry, climate, soil mineral matter, cation exchange capacity of soil, soil erosion, land uses and land cover, impact of soil loss and land cover on biogeochemical cycles.
This module deals with Coordination Chemistry: coordination compounds, Werner’s Coordination Theory, electronic interpretation, nomenclature, isomerism in coordination complexes; and Structures of Ionic Compounds: close packing of spheres, interstitial sites, crystals, binary compounds, ternary compounds.
This module concerns with Basic Concepts of Chemical Kinetics: introduction, rate or velocity of a reaction, collision theory of reaction rate, factors affecting the reaction rate, rate law and rate constant, ionic and molecular reactions, molecularity of a reaction, order of a reaction, reactions of first order, second order and third order, reversible or opposing reactions, reaction of higher order-explanation of their rarity on the bases of reaction mechanism, zero order reactions, determination of the order of a reaction, disturbing factors in the determination of order; Chemical Equilibrium: reversible processes, the law of mass action, the reaction quotient, the equilibrium constant, thermodynamic derivation of the equilibrium constant, relationship between Kp and Kc, Le-Chatelier-Braun principle, types of chemical equilibria, variation of equilibrium constant with temperature and pressure; The Phase Rule: the statement, definitions of “phase” and “components”, degrees of freedom, derivation of the phase rule, one component systems, polymorphism, experimental determination of transition point, the water system, the sulphur system, two-component systems, the silver-lead system, the zinc-cadmium system, potassium iodide-water system, magnesium-zinc system, the ferric chloride-water system, the sodium sulphate-water system.
This module covers isomerism of organic compounds; natural products and heterocyclic compounds that include such titles as natural products and commercial medicines, phytochemicals of medicinal value in plants, heterocyclic compounds, alkaloids; natural and synthetic polymers, stereochemistry of polymerization; and carbohydrates.
This module deals with the chemistry of water. Water is the compound of life and the only substance that exists naturally on earth. Water has a number of unique chemical and physical properties that make it essential for life. This module covers water on the earth, hydrologic (water) cycle, sources of water, properties of water, water availability and use, water distribution on earth, methods of water distribution, systems of water supply, water chemistry, water quality standards, environmental water quality, assessment of water quality, water quality parameters, water analysis, sources of water pollution, prevention and control of water pollution, water pollution due to lead poisoning, water treatment processes that includes sewage treatment, industrial water treatment, municipal sewage treatment and water softening, and wastewater processing.
This module concerns with the chemistry of atmosphere. It covers earth’s atmosphere, concentrations of chemical species and measures of atmospheric composition, phenomena in the outer layer’s of the atmosphere, geochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon, depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, volcanoes, the green house effect, acid rain, photochemical smog and indoor pollution.
These modules aims to provide chemistry knowledge of minerals, rocks and soils to students who majoring in geology subjects.
In first semester, students will learn three main parts. The first part deals with transition metals that include members and configurations, characteristic properties, oxidation states and compound formation, 3d-, 4d- and 5d-transition series elements, complex ion formation, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel. Second part is concerned with basic concepts of thermodynamics that encompass terms and basic concepts, types of systems, intensive and extensive properties, state of system, thermodynamic processes, nature of heat and work, isothermal reversible and irreversible expansion works of an ideal gas, maximum work done in reversible expansion, internal energy, first law of thermodynamics, enthalpy of a system, molar heat capacities, Joule-Thomson Effect, adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas, spontaneous process, the Carnot cycle, derivation of entropy from Carnot cycle, entropy change in an irreversible process, entropy change for an ideal gas, Zeroth law of thermodynamics. The final part is concerned with nature of aromatic compounds, and benzene and its homologues.
In second semester, students will learn Structures of Ionic Compounds: close packing of spheres, interstitial sites, crystals, binary and ternary compounds; Basic Concepts of Chemical Kinetics: rate or velocity of a reaction, collision theory of reaction rate, factors affecting the reaction rate, rate law and rate constant, ionic and molecular reactions, molecularity of a reaction, order of a reaction, reaction of the first order, second order and third order, reversible or opposing reactions, reaction of higher order-explanation of their rarity on the bases of reaction mechanism, zero order reactions, determination of the order of a reaction, disturbing factors in the determination of order; and Chemical Equilibrium: reversible process, thermodynamic derivation of the equilibrium constant, the Le-Chatelier-Braun Principle, types of chemical equilibria, variation of equilibrium constant with temperature and pressure.
These modules aims to provide chemistry knowledge of lives to students who majoring in zoology, botany and biotechnology.
In first semester, student able to familiarize with 1) Aromatic Compounds: nature and structure, aromaticity and Hückel rule, and benzene and its homologues; 2) Natural Products and Heterocyclic Compounds: natural products and commercial medicines, phytochemicals of medicinal value in plants, heterocyclic compounds and alkaloids; and 3) Polyfunctional Compounds: polyhydric alcohols, dicarboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, keto acids, keto esters and diesters.
In second semester student will learn three main parts. The first parts deals with isomerism of organic compounds that includes classification of isomerism, constitutional structural isomerism, and conformational isomerism. Second part concerns with carbohydrates that includes nomenclature, monosaccharides, disaccharides and polysaccharides, formation of esters and ethers, formation of glycosides. The final part reveals natural and synthetic polymers and in this session students will get knowledge on general principle of polymer formation, polymerization, vinyl polymers, structure and stereochemistry of polymers.
This module composed with organometallic chemistry and complexes of acceptor π ligands.
Organometallic Chemistry: classification, bonding and synthetic methods, thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities, properties and reactions, catalytic reactions, stoichiometric reactions (insertion, oxidative-addition).
Complexes of Acceptor π Ligands: noble gas formulation, carbon monoxide complexes, nitric oxide complexes, donor complexes of group VB and group VIB ligands, cyanide complexes, and ligands having extended π systems.
This module deals with 1) Basic Concepts of Molecular Spectroscopy: fundamentals of molecular spectroscopy, energy of molecules, microwave spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy, ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy; 2) Surface Chemistry and Surface Thermodynamics: adsorption on solid surfaces, liquids on solids and liquids, surface–active agents (surfactants): soluble materials, surface-active agents: insoluble surface films, surface-active agents: other phenomena, molecules between phases, pressure across an interface, spreading of liquids and capillary rise, adsorption in liquid systems and surface films.
This module concerns with two main parts, namely, Theoretical Concepts of Organic Chemistry and Nucleophilic Substitution and Elimination Reactions.
Aim of the first part is to provide knowledge on theoretical concepts of organic chemistry that is essential to learn typical organic reactions further. In this part, students will learn what are meant by reactants and reactions, what types of reactions happen in organic compounds, factors that influencing a reaction, what are carbocations, carbanions, and radicals.
In second part, students are able to learn nucleophilic substitution reactions, factors affecting SN1 and SN2 reactions, elimination reaction, competition between Substitution and elimination.
This module enables students to understand practical aspects of chemical analysis, treatment of analytical data, gravimetric analysis and precipitation titrations. The detailed descriptions of these courses are as follow.
Practical Aspects of Chemical Analysis: analysis of real samples, preparing samples for analysis, decomposing and dissolving the samples; Treatment of Analytical Data: significant figures, accuracy and precision, types of error in experimental data, statistical treatment of data; Gravimetric Analysis: general principles of gravimetric analysis, stoichiometry of gravimetric reaction, formation and properties of precipitates, drying and ignition of precipitates, organic precipitants, solubility equilibrium; Precipitation Titrations: requirements for precipitation titrations, titration curve for precipitation titrations, end points for Argentometric titrations, applications of standard silver nitrate solutions.
The purpose of this module is to enable students to familarise with fundamental concepts of biochemistry, biomolecules, enzymes, metabolism and molecular genetics.
Fundamental Concepts: bioelements, important functional groups in biomolecules, the specific interactions of biomolecules depend on noncovalent bonds, properties of water; Biomolecules: carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleic acids; Enzymes: characteristics, nomenclature and classification, mechanism and types of enzyme action, enzyme catalysts activity, factors that affect enzyme activity, enzyme kinetic, enzyme units, enzyme inhibitor, enzyme parts list; Metabolism: what is cell, introduction to metabolism, intermediary metabolism, glycolysis, citric acid cycle; Molecular Genetics: Waston-Crick double helix, biosynthesis of DNA (replication), biosynthesis of RNA (transcription), biosynthesis of protein (translation), and mutation.
The purpose of this module is to enable students to examine how to use instruments in analysis of chemical compounds. The module covers separation methods that will explain the methods of solvent extraction and chromatic separation. In addition, students can learn the use of Ultraviolet and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy in quantitative and qualitative analyses.
This module composed of two main parts, namely, Nonaqueous Solvents Systems and Theories of the Coordinate Bond in Metal Complexes.
Nonaqueous Solvents Systems: classification of solvents, general properties of ionising solvents, liquid ammonia as solvent, liquid sulphur dioxide as solvent, liquid hydrogen fluoride, liquid hydrogen cyanide, acetic acid, and other non-aqueous solvents.
Theories of the Coordinate Bond in Metal Complexes: valence bond theory, crystal field theory, ligand field theory, molecular orbital theory, and stability of complex ions.
This module covers 1) Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules: basic terms and definitions, polymerization reactions, molecular weight determination methods, polymer morphology, thermal properties, differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry; 2) Quantum Chemistry: waves and particles, historical perspective, electromagnetic radiation, the wave theory, particle nature of radiation, spectroscopy, the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom, the De Broglie Principle, electron diffraction, diffraction of neutral particles, superposition, wave packets and uncertainty principle, the wave function and the postulate of quantum theory, the Schrodinger Equation, the wave function and probability density, operators, average values, the tunneling phenomenon.
Two parts are composed of this module, namely, Stereochemistry and Chemistry of Amino acids, Peptides, Proteins and Nucleic Acids.
Stereochemistry: stereoisomers, conformational and configurational isomers, prediction of enantiomerism, naming enantiomers by using R, S system of nomenclature, optical activity, specification of configuration for more than one chiral centre, diastereomers, meso compounds, separation of enantiomers, and resolution of a racemic modification.
Amino acids, Peptides, Proteins and Nucleic Acids: structures of amino acids, dipolar structure of amino acids, isoelectric point, separation of amino acids, synthesis of a-amino acids, reactions of amino acids, resolution of racemic mixtures of amino acids, peptides, determination of peptide structure, synthesis of peptides, classification of proteins, protein structures, determination the primary structure of a protein, denaturation of protein, nucleic acids, the structure of DNA and RNA, and hydrolysis of nucleic acid.
This module enables students to understand acid base equilibria and titration, equilibria in oxidation reduction systems, and potentiometric methods. The detailed descriptions of these courses are as follow.
Acid Base Equilibria and Titration: fundamental concept of acidity and basicity, equilibrium calculations for solutions of acids and bases, acid-base titration, and titration curves; Equilibria in Oxidation Reduction Systems: oxidation-reduction equilibria, half-reactions, fundamentals of electrochemistry, schematic representation of electrochemical cells, electrode potential or relative half-cell potential, effect of concentration on electrode potentials; Potentiometric Methods: electrode systems, inert electrodes, measurement of cell emf, the potentiometer, potentiometric titrations, reference electrode, indicator electrodes and salt bridge and liquid junction potentials
This module enables students to know more about atmosphere, air pollution, radiation pollution, noise pollution, air pollution control technology, ambient air quality, water quality today, types and effects of water pollution, pollutants, prevention and control of water pollution, water legislation, water resources, major water compartments, water availability and use, solid waste, waste disposal methods, hazardous and toxic wastes, types of environmental health hazards, mechanisms for minimizing toxic effects, measuring toxicity, risk assessment and acceptance, establishing public policy; objectives for environmental policy, law and planning, environmental policy, environmental laws, environmental planning, planning for water environment, establishment of maximum contamination levels (MCLs).
This module enables students to familiarize with chemistry of radiations. The module concerns with sources of radiation, types of radiation, physical and chemical aspects, radiation chemistry reactions, radiation measurement, inorganic solids, organic solids, radiation dosimetry, radiation processing, radiation preservation and sterilization and radiation safety.
In first semester, students will learn enzyme chemistry and kinetics. This module enables students to familiarize with characteristic of enzyme, nomenclature and classification of enzyme, mechanism and type of enzyme action, enzyme catalyst activity, factors that affect enzyme activity, enzyme kinetic and determination of kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax), enzyme units, enzyme inhibitor and enzyme parts list.
In second semester students are able to learn and get experience in separation techniques of organic compounds such as solvent extraction methods and chromatographic separation techniques.
This module composed of three main topics, namely Stability of Isotopes, Symmetry and Point Groups, and Toxicological Effects of Mercury and Arsenic Compounds.
Stability of Isotopes: nuclear structure and stability, radioactivity and nuclear decay, discovery of isotopes, nuclear reaction, nuclear models, analysis of radioactive environmental sample, and health and safety aspects; Symmetry and Point Groups: symmetry operations and symmetry elements, inverse operations, groups and their basic properties, point groups, systematic classification of molecules into point groups, and matrices; Toxicological Effects of Mercury and Arsenic Compounds: sources, physical and chemical properties, compounds of mercury and arsenic, health effects, risk assessment, preventive and remedial measures.
This module deals with 1) Statistical Thermodynamics: the Boltzmann Distribution Law, Gibbs Ensembles, the Canonical Partition Function and thermodynamic properties, the electronic partition function, the translational partition function, the rotational partition function, the vibrational partition function, chemical equilibrium in ideal gas; Rotational Spectroscopy: pure rotational spectra, heteronuclear diatomic molecules, rigid rotor in a plane, rigid rotor, polyatomic molecules, a survey of rotational spectroscopy; Vibrational Spectroscopy: the harmonic oscillator model, ro-vibrational spectra of diatomic molecules, Raman scattering, effects of anharmonicity and nonrigidity, polyatomic molecules, a survey of vibrational spectroscopy.
This module deals with Electrophilic Addition to Unsaturated Carbons, Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution and Fundamental Concepts of Organic Spectroscopy. Specific examples revealed in Electrophilic Addition are halogenation, addition of hypohalous acids, hydrohalogenation, hydration, epoxidation-hydroxylation, addition of carbine, addition to alkenes, hydrogenation and ozonolysis. Typical examples enable to study in the chapter of Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution are halogenations, nitration, sulfonation, alkylation and acylation of aromatic rings, alkylation of benzene via acylation-reduction, the diazonium ion as an electrophile, ipso substitution. In addition, reactivity of aromatic rings and the effect of substituents on orientation are enabled to study in this module. Moreover, student can learn electromagnetic radiation, UV-Visible and FT-IR spectroscopy.
This module has two parts. The first part deals with Separation by Extraction and Chromatographic Methods. This part enable students to learn the distribution coefficient, the distribution ratio, multiple extraction, the completeness of multiple extractions, types of extraction procedures, the effect of ph and reagent concentration on distribution ratios, chromatography, gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatography (LC), ion chromatography (IC), thin layer chromatography (TLC). Second part concerns with Fundamentals of Electrode Processes including introduction to electrochemistry, electrogravimetric method and coulometric methods, polarography.
The purpose of this module is to enable student to be equipped with research methodology. After completion of this module, students will know the basic concept of research methodology, the importance of literature survey before doing research, how to design a research, how to collect data and how to ananlyse the data collected. Finally, they will study report writing and make a presentation.
This module deals with origin and nature of petroleum, properties of hydrocarbon constituents, petrochemicals, and cracking processes.
This module deals with actinide elements and electronic absorption spectra of complexes. The purpose of studying actinide elements is to students enable to know general features, electronic structures and oxidation state of these elements, actinide contraction, production and properties of actinide elements in their compounds, radioactivity of actinides, separation and production of transuranium elements, radiation hazard of tranuranium elements and their application. The aim to study electronic absorption spectra of complexes is to enable students to familiarize with the geometry of the orbitals, the vector model of the atom, term energy level diagrams, Tanabe-Sugano diagrams, thermodynamic and kinetic stability of complexes and their optical activity.
This module composed of Electrochemistry and Quantum Chemistry. Students can learn Electrolytes in Solution that deals with specific conductance, molar conductance, conductance in electrolytic dissociation, colligative properties and electrolytic dissociation, electrolysis, transference number, ionic mobilities, applications, dielectric effect, ionic strength, Debye-Huckel Theory, activities from the Debye-Huckel theory, activities in more concentrated solution. In addition, this module enable student to learn Electromotive Forces of Electrochemical Cells that deals with electrodes, cell EMF, standard electrode potential, EMF and activities, activities coefficient EMF’s, equilibrium constant from EMF’s, electrode- concentration cell, electrolyte-concentration cell, junction potential, salt bridge, ion selective electrode, thermodynamic properties from cell EMF’s. Moreover, this module offers students enable to learn second part of Quantum Chemistry that deals with the Schrodinger equation, atomic orbitals and its graphical presentation, spin and fine structure concerning with the Hydrogen Atom, synthesizing wave functions, principle of superposition, the variation principle, the secular determinant, perturbation theory, qualitative features of the approximate methods.
The module has three main parts, namely, Nucleophilic Addition to Carbonyl Group, Nucleophilic Substitution on Carbonyl Group and Organic Spectroscopy. Nucleophilic Addition to Carbonyl Group (Aldehydes and Ketones): reactivity of the carbonyl groups, cyanide as the nucleophile, oxygen or sulphur as the nucleophile, hydride as the nucleophile, carbon as the nucleophile, nitrogen as the nucleophile; Nucleophilic Substitution on Carbonyl Group (Carboxylic Acid Family): reactivity in the carboxylic acid family, acyl halides and anhydrides, oxygen or sulphur as the nucleophile (ester and carboxylic acids), nitrogen as the nucleophile, and carbon as the nucleophile; Fundamental Concepts of Organic Spectroscopy: NMR Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry.
This module has two parts. The first part concerns with Fundamentals of Spectroscopic Techniques and Analysis that enable student to learn absorption of radiation, absorption spectra, atomic absorption, molecular absorption, infrared absorption, absorption of ultraviolet and visible radiation, relaxation process, terms employed in absorption spectrometry, Beer’s Law and emission of electromagnetic radiation. In second, students will learn Complex Formation Equilibria that deals with complex formation reactions, complex formation constants, the Liebig titration, titrations with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, metal-EDTA complexes, direct titration of calcium with EDTA and end point detection.
This module introduces students to basic concepts of nanoscience, basic techniques for fabrication of nanomaterials and applications of nanomaterials.
The purpose of this module is to enable student to familarise with Radioactivity and how to produce radioisotopes and the uses of radioisotopes.
In first semester, students will learn Gamma Spectrometry that describes stable and radioactive atoms, radiation and matter, radiation detectors, gamma spectrometer, qualitative and quantitative interpretation. In addition, students will study Inorganic Reaction Mechanism that presents introduction, classification, dissociation and addition reactions, free radical reactions, substitution reactions and oxidation reduction reactions.
In second semester, Fundamental Aspects of Solid State Chemistry: experimental evidence on structure, structure and properties, and structure and properties of transition metal oxides; and Group Theory and its Applications: representation of groups, reducible and irreducible representation, some important reducible representation, group theory and vibrational spectroscopy, some further aspects of vibrational spectroscopy, some applications of group theory in bonding would be learnt.
In first semester, student able to study 1) Chemical Kinetics in Solutions: A comparison of Kinetics in Solution and Gas, Diffusion Control Reactions, Relaxation Methods, Proton Transfer and Acid Base Catalysis, Enzyme Kinetics, Ionic Reaction in Solution, Kinetics of Polymerization, and Oscillating Reactions; 2) Heterogeneous and Electrochemical Reactions: Adsorption and Desorption, Adsorption Isotherm, Heterogeneous Catalysis, Electrode Kinetics; 3) Energy Transfer and Photochemistry: Interaction of Radiation with Matter, Radiative and Nonradiative Transition in Molecules, Energy Transfer, Photochemical Reactions.
In second semester student will learn Quantum Chemistry that reveals (i) Atoms: Electronic Structure and Spectra describing on the lowest energy level of the helium atom, spin and antisymmetric wave functions, electronic configurations of atoms and the periodic table, interpretation of atomic spectra; and (ii) Diatomic Molecule: Bonding and Electronic Spectra Ionic Interactions that describes separation of nuclear and electronic motion, the hydrogen molecular ion, homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules and electronic spectroscopy. In addition, students will learn Material Science that reveals (i) The Geometry of Nanoscale Carbon and Fullerenes depicting bonding, dimensionality, topology, curvature, energetics, kinetics, other rings, holes, families of fullerenes: from C60 to TNTs, reactivity, potential applications and (ii) Characterization and Properties of Nanomaterials presenting introduction, structural characterization, chemical characterization, physical properties of nanomaterials, electrical conductivity, ferroelectrics and dielectrics, superparamagnetism.
The purpose of Chem 5203 is to enable students to familarise with advanced organic spectroscopic techniques (1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.) and advanced organic reaction mechanisms.
Chem 5209 composed of three main parts, namely, Synthesis of Organic Compounds, Chromatographic Separation Techniques, and Organometallic Compounds. The first part includes multistep organic synthesis, functional group introduction, removal and interconversion, and retrosynthetic analysis (disconnections). The second part, students can learn partition chromatography, thin layer and paper chromatography, adsorption chromatography and column chromatography. The final part of this module concerns with Organometallic Compounds that describes nomenclature, carbon-metal bonds, preparation of organolithium compound, preparation of magnesium compound, Grignard reagent, synthesis of alcohol using Grignard or Organolithium reagents, synthesis of acetylenic alcohols, retrosynthetic analysis, preparation of tertiary alcohol from esters and Grignard reagents, alkane synthesis using organocopper reagents, an organozinc reagent for cyclopropane synthesis, carbenes and carbenoids, and transition metal organometallic compound.
The purpose former module is to enable students to get practice how to determine pH by graphical methods and to familiarize with sensors that use in analyses. Graphical Determination of pH and Chemical Species in Aqueous Solutions: molecular structure and acid-base strength, factors affecting the interaction of acids and bases with water, ph of aqueous solution, logarithmic diagram for acid-base equilibria; Chemical Sensors: introduction, definition, classification of chemical sensors, description of chemical sensors; Biosensors: introduction, producing biological surface, achievement of biotransduction.
Later module composed of three parts, namely, Optical Methods, Continuous Automatic Instrumentation for Process Application, and ORD and CD. The details descriptions of these courses are as follow. Optical Methods (Emission, Absorption, Fluorescence): fundamentals of spectrophotometry, spectroscopic instruments and analysis; Continuous Automatic Instrumentation for Process Application: autoanalyzer, process analyzer; and Optical Rotatory Dispersion and Circular Dichroism: property of light wave, optical rotation, ORD, CD, relationship of ORD and CD, the physical basis of optical rotation and CD, Usefulness of CD.
The purpose of these modules is to enable students to know more about Nuclear Chemistry. In first semester, students will learn Principles of Radioactive Decay Process and Detection of Radioisotopes concerning with instability of nuclei, alpha decay, spontaneous fission, beta decay, gamma transition, ionization detectors, scintillation detectors, photographic detection methods, nuclear track detectors, cloud chambers and bubble chambers, coincidence and anticoincidence measurements.
In second semester, students will learn Methods of Production of Isotopes and Nuclear Energy concerning with production of radioisotopes, production of neutron-excess radioisotopes, production of neutron- deficient radioisotopes, generator produced radioisotopes, activation analysis, radio isotopic purity, natural production of radioisotopes, basic principles of chain-reacting system, reactors and their uses, reactor- associated problems, and controlled-thermonuclear reactions.
The purpose of this module is to enable students to know nutrient requirements in human, energy requirements in human, macronutrient and mineral, dietary recommendation, protein-calorie malnutrition, and nutrition and chronic diseases.
This module introduces students with nanochemistry. Firstly, students will learn preparative methods of nanomaterials. Then, they will study characterization techniques of nanomaterials such as XRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR and UV. Moreover, Students will be able to appreciate Recent Developments in Nanotechnology such as nanotech-enable sensors and sensor system; semiconductor nanostructures for detection and degradation of low-level organic contaminants from water; and sorptive properties of monolayer protective-protected gold nanoparticle films for chemical vapour sensors.
These modules are aimed for students who attending master class majoring in Chemistry. They will take taught courses in first three semesters. It is compulsory for all students to conduct their research in last semester and submit the thesis to the board of examiners.
These modules concern with inorganic chemistry and nuclear chemistry including a wide range of topics in transition elements and the electronic structures of their compounds; inorganic reaction mechanisms of complexes; homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reactions of organometallic compounds; bioinorganic chemistry, solid state chemistry, advanced nuclear chemistry and selected topics.
These modules offer students colloidal, surface and catalytic chemistry, equilibrium electrochemistry, advance quantum chemistry, chemical statistics and transport phenomena and dynamic electrode kinetic. In addition, selected topics in physical chemistry can also be studied.
Stereochemistry of organic compounds, conformational analyses, organic spectroscopy, medicinal chemistry, advance heterocyclic chemistry, organic polymers, chemistry of natural products and organic synthesis can be studied in this module. Selected topics in organic chemistry will also be included.
These modules include electroanalytical chemistry, environmental chemistry, quantitative analyses by spectroscopic techniques and X-ray methods and crystallography. Moreover, this module also introduces students to selected topics in analytical chemistry.

Contact Information

Prof. Dr. Cho Cho Win

Head of Department - Chemistry
Department of Chemistry, Dagon University, Bohmu Ba Htoo Road, Yangon
(+95-01) 585171, (+95-09) 5092616
chemistry@dagonuniversity.edu.mm

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